Displaying items by tag: networking

SENSE letterhead 2020

2 June 2020

Dear conference delegate,

We're almost there! Final preparations are underway.
Look out for our e-mail tomorrow morning with the links to join the webinars and networking.

Please make sure you have downloaded Zoom* & created your own free account (go to https://zoom.us/ to do this) in advance of the first conference session on Wednesday 3 June at 12:45. 

If you have a question for the speaker, please ask it using the Q&A tab at the base of your Zoom screen. You can upvote a question asked by another participant that you find particularly relevant. You can use the Zoom chat function to exchange messages with fellow delegates, and if you wish to talk about our conference on social media, (please do!) include our hashtag: #SENSE2020. 

On the conference days there will be a networking break in the middle of the afternoon, and you can network all evening from 19:00 CEST!

Wind down after three days of intense CPD with an online pub quiz organised by Capital Translation’s Lloyd Bingham. Compete individually against your SENSE colleagues and show what you know. Rounds will include general knowledge, film and history, but there will be plenty of language questions too! Doors open at 19:45 pm for a 20:00 start.

See you Wednesday,

SENSE 2020 Conference Team
conference@sense-online.nl 

* Zoom has issued many security updates, so please make sure you have the latest version.

SENSE letterhead 2020

 

Read the conference newsletters here! 

If you haven't received our mails, please check your spam box and add sense-online.nl to your list of trusted senders!

 

SENSE letterhead 2020

 

29 May 2020

Dear delegate,

We're looking forward to a unique conference next week. Preparations are in full swing, so keep an eye on the programme page for possible last-minute changes.

Please make sure you download* Zoom & create your own free account (go to https://zoom.us/ to do this) well in advance of the first conference session and log in on Wednesday 3 June at 12:45. 

To find out more about Zoom, you can check out this SENSE blog:

https://www.sense-online.nl/publications/blog/1244-dr-strange-times-or-how-i-learned-to-stop-worrying-and-love-the-zoom

The format for the conference will be a Zoom webinar. Only speakers, their shared screens and the co-host will be visible on your screen. The co-hosts will briefly introduce the speaker and then switch off their video before the speaker starts to talk.

If you have a question for the speaker, please ask it using the Q&A tab at the base of your zoom screen. You can upvote a question asked by another participant that you find particularly pertinent. As the speaker winds up their talk, the co-host will come back ‘on stage’, select the most relevant and/or interesting questions, and put these to the speaker. We value your feedback on this new format of conference and to this end we will be sending an evaluation form by e-mail at the end of each day. Please take a few minutes to fill it in.

To join a conference session, simply click on the link in the mail we will send you and follow the instructions. There will be a link for each of the conference sessions: talks and networking. Please look out for these mails each morning of the conference, particularly if you have a Google mail address, as our message may be sorted into a ‘news’ or other category folder.
If you haven't received our mail, please white-list ‘sense-online.nl’.

The conference team are looking forward to your participation in our first online conference. By the way, there are still some spaces available for some of the workshops

No conference would be complete without networking! We will be providing Zoom meetings for networking in smaller groups, BYOB, during the breaks and at the end of each conference day. More details to follow.

See you next Wednesday,

SENSE 2020 Conference Team
conference@sense-online.nl 

* Zoom has issued many security updates, so please make sure you have the latest version.

SENSE 2020 Conference goes online!SENSE2020 Goes Online

At the end of March we had to announce the cancellation of our 2020 Jubilee Conference in Maastricht. 

We were not happy having to do this, but COVID-19 thought otherwise. 

To make something positive from all the doom and gloom we are pleased to announce that the conference will now take place online in the afternoons of 3, 4 and 5 June 2020.

The pre-conference workshops we had planned in Maastricht will now take place as a series throughout May and June, so you can attend as many as you wish.

We have reduced and simplified the prices for this online format. And because these are a fraction of what they were before, there is no early-bird discount, but members of our sister societies will benefit from special rates for the conference and workshops.

You can register for a workshop or the conference up to 16:00 on the day before it starts, as long as we have received your payment, you will be sent the access codes for attending.   

Click here to register for the online conference

Please see the programme page for details and go to the events calendar to register for what promises to be a unique and exciting event. 

The SENSE 2020 Conference team
Ashley, Jenny, John, Ken, Liz, Lloyd, Marieke, Matthew, Theresa

Sponsored by PerfectIt 

 

 

Macros for Writers, Editors and Translators

Paul Beverley, United Kingdom

“If you think that macros are a ‘good thing’, you’re right!” says macro “guru” Paul Beverley, whom SENSE has invited specially to facilitate this Zoom webinar on “Macros for Writers, Editors and Translators”. Not only to appease Paul’s myriad “macro groupies” in the Netherlands but also to introduce others to the marvels of his macros.

Date: Saturday, 16 May 2020
Time: 10:00–15:00 (registration on the Zoom platform from 09:40)
Venue: Zoom video conference (registered attendees will receive the link beforehand)

During the webinar, Paul will provide you with a whole range of macros to use in your work and will also give you a chance to try them out while he’s on hand to help you if you have queries.

The day will provide you first with a conceptual framework to enable you to see what macros can do for you. You’ll also learn how they can be combined with your existing intellectual and professional abilities to enable you to work faster and to produce higher-quality documents.

If you are starting with zero knowledge of macros, the training will lead you through from square one. But for those of you who have already been using some macros, there will be plenty of scope for learning new tips and tricks. As there are well over 700 macros available (!), there is always something new to help you boost your effectiveness as a writer, an editor or a translator. So whether you are a “macro newby” or a seasoned and serious devotee, there’s bound to be something new for you to take away from the day’s sessions.

There will be one lecture-type session (first session, 10:00–11:00) to kick off with in order to explain the principles; this will be followed by two practical sessions, each introduced with a demonstration. Use your laptop, in the comfort of your own home office, to install a set of 20 new macros, and then off you go!

Take advantage of this unique offering to adopt, adapt or simply embrace macros with open arms in your work routine under the caring, expert eye of macro-creator and supplier supreme, Paul Beverley.

A brief overview of the webinar programme:
10:00–11:00 Lecture-type session to introduce you to the use of macros or to more “advanced” aspects, depending on your level of knowledge of and experience with macros in MS Word
11:00–13:00 Under Paul’s supervision, and in contact with him as and when necessary, exploring and experimenting with some of his 700 macros to your heart’s delight
13:00–14:00 Lunch break
14:00–15:00 Further exploration and experimentation, and Q&A, before wrapping up.

Register here.

About the presenter

Paul Paul BeverleyBeverley has been creating macros for use by editors and proofreaders for over 13 years. The macros (over 700 of them) are freely available via his website and are used in more than 40 countries. Despite being of pensionable age, he enjoys editing far too much to stop altogether, so he occasionally edits technical books and theses. He has also produced more than 100 training videos, so that you can see the macros in action on his YouTube channel

Take advantage of this unique opportunity to adopt, adapt or simply embrace macros with open arms in your work routine under the caring, expert eye of macro-creator and supplier supreme, Paul Beverley. We hope to see you there!

Register now for this unique SENSE online workshop and benefit from the early-bird price until midnight on 1 May.

Future competence profiles of EU translators

Emma Hartkamp, the Netherlands

The European Commission’s DG Translation (DGT) fulfils an important role as language services provider in the EU’s multilingual context, and will continue to do so in the future. As translation technology progresses and the DGT’s role and mix of resources change, so the competence profiles of its translation staff will need to be updated.

In this presentation, you will hear about current reflections on new, future-oriented competence profiles for translation staff of the different EU institutions. These will be based both on the current translator profile and on a comprehensive mapping and description of the current and future functions, roles, tasks, competencies and profiles of EU translation staff.

It goes without saying that technological developments – in particular that of machine translation – will require high-level human and linguistic competencies and that the EU institutions will continue to need highly skilled professional translators. For these reasons, the DGT collaborates with a network of MA programmes in Translation (the EMT network) in order to work towards improving the quality of training and helping young graduates to integrate smoothly into the translation job market.

Click here to register for the online conference

About the presenter

Emma Hartkamp

Emma Hartkamp works as a Language Officer for the Representation of the European Commission in The Hague. Previously, she worked as a translator and advisor at the Directorate for Translation of the European Parliament. She began her career as a freelance interpreter and translator in Paris.

Audience IMG 7943 X CropOnline conference fees

In line with the reduced scale of the conference programme and because both the conference and the workshops are being presented online (thanks to Zoom), the pricing for both has been simplified and considerably reduced: to attend all three half-days of the conference will now cost only € 60 for members of SENSE and € 75 for non-members. The fee for attending an online workshop is now € 30 for members and € 60 for non-members. Unfortunately, it will not be possible to book separate tickets for just one or two conference days.

When you come to register, if you can't find the option you are looking for, please contact us. 

 

 Category Standard fee
 SENSE members € 60.00
 Members of sister societies* € 67.50
 Non-members € 75.00

 

What this fee includes:

  • Three afternoons of online conference sessions 
  • Online networking time in small groups before, during and after the conference sessions 
 Workshops  Standard fee
 SENSE members   € 30.00
 Members of sister societies* € 45.00
 Non-members € 60.00

 

Members and non-members pay different fees to attend the online conference and workshops (membership costs only € 80 per year).  
* MET, NEaT, SfEP, APTRAD, EASE 
N.B. SENSE is not registered for VAT and does not charge VAT. 

Click here to register for the online conference

Sponsored by PerfectIt

 © Images by photographer Michael Hartwigsen of SENSE’s inaugural conference, held in celebration of our 25th Jubilee, at Paushuize, Utrecht on 14 November 2015. All rights reserved.

 

2018 Conference

Englishes now!

trends affecting language professionals

Word skills for editors and translators

Jenny Zonneveld, the Netherlands

MS Word is one of the essential tools of our trade and mastering it will give you more time to focus on and enjoy creating beautiful language. But in order to deliver ready-to-use documents, editors and translators often have to tidy up the client’s draft first. Tackling this can be a quick-and-easy way to impress, but many language professionals lack the finer points of MS Word, so they pass up this opportunity.

Besides picking up many productivity tips, you’ll learn and practise how to tidy up a document by:

  • defining and applying styles to create a consistent layout;
  • controlling numbering and bullets;
  • applying headings to generate the perfect table of contents;
  • dealing with headers and footers in large documents with multiple sections.

If you want to focus on your clients’ message rather than on what MS Word does when you’re not looking, then this one’s for you! Focusing as it does on the practical aspects of tidying up a document rather than on the individual word features, this workshop is ideal for any language professional who wants to use MS Word more efficiently and effectively. Participants should bring their own laptop to the workshop.

Register here.

About the presenter

John Linnegar

Jenny Zonneveld has a business background. Before she became a freelance translator, copywriter, and editor over 20 years ago, she spent more than 15 years at a firm of management consultants and worked in the UK, USA, Belgium, and the Netherlands. At the start of her freelance career Jenny compiled and prepared a series of reports stretching to hundreds of pages and including many tables and images, all in MS Word. In 2002 she developed a two-day hands-on MS Word workshop for SENSE, which was presented several times. From 2004 to 2006 it was offered to translation students as part of the Editing Minor run by SENSE and the ITV School of Interpreters & Translators.

Getting to grips with connectors in English texts

John Linnegar, Belgium

An increasing number of authors are having to write in English as their SL or FL. This places the onus on copy-editors and revisors to improve authors' writing so as to render it accessible to readers. Sometimes, in order to do so optimally, grammar skills need to be honed further. The incorrect or inappropriate use of connectors (either verbal connectors or punctuation marks) is a particularly troublesome aspect of much writing that requires editorial intervention.

This workshop will focus on the devices that can be used in written texts to ensure a smooth flow and logical connections between the parts of sentences, and even between sentences themselves. Skilled use of the appropriate connectors ultimately leads to texts that convey an author’s intended meaning most effectively. Such texts are also more accessible to readers.

We will be investigating ways of using (and ‘abusing’) both verbal connectors – conjunctions, relative pronouns, sentence adverbials – and punctuation marks – in particular the comma, the semicolon, the colon, the dash, parentheses – not only correctly but also to achieve the author's intended effect or meaning.

The participants will ‘learn by doing’ by engaging with a selection of substandard texts and considering ways of making them flow more smoothly and logically, using any or all of these devices. What will emerge from this workshop is a better grasp of how to use each of these connective devices to best effect.

Register here.

About the presenter

John Linnegar

An author and a passionate copy-editor with some 40+ years’ of manuscript improvement behind him, John Linnegar is a former teacher of English at secondary school and undergraduate levels. His specialty as an editor is law. In 2009 he published a book on common errors committed by writers in English in South Africa (NB Publishers, reprinted 2013); in 2012 he co-authored Text Editing: A Handbook for Students and Practitioners (UA Press) and in 2019, together with Ken McGillivray, wrote and published grammar, punctuation and all that jazz … (MLA Publishers). He contributes regular articles on the usage and abusage of the English language to professional bodies.

Using your network to branch out into new areas

Sally Hill, the Netherlands

To ensure the money keeps rolling in, freelance language professionals must keep their skills up to date but also follow changes in the market and in clients’ needs. Adjusting the way we run our businesses sometimes means learning new skills and even branching out into new areas. However, as freelancers we are not necessarily well equipped to make such changes on our own, and we must therefore make use of others in our network – be this in the form of a mentor or of sharing with others who are going through the same process.

In this presentation I will share with you how an increase in clients’ requests for writing services led me to get interested in medical writing. I will recount how I got in touch with others in this field and helped set up a network for science and medical writers in the Netherlands. Organising and attending events for the network has led not only to new contacts but also several new clients. I’ve also learned a lot more about using social media platforms. An additional discovery along the way is that many young scientists with language skills are looking to move away from academia and into writing jobs in the Netherlands – a move that may need the support of organisations such as SENSE.

This session will probably be of interest to language professionals – freelance or otherwise – looking to move into new areas. I hope to give you pointers on how you can use your network to explore new options, discover new talents and expand your business. Those interested in learning more about medical writing and the newly formed Netherlands SciMed Writers Network are also very welcome to attend.

Click here to register for the online conference

About the presenter

Sally Hill

Sally Hill studied biology at the universities of Sheffield and Nijmegen. A former research scientist, she works as a freelance medical writer, editor and trainer in scientific writing at Dutch universities. She finds her experience in education sometimes slows down her editing work, though using the comments function to educate her non-student clients about good writing is not necessarily a bad thing. She is a keen networker and helps organise meetings for other Netherlands-based science and medical writers. She’s also a contributor to and editor of the SENSE blog.

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