Starters SIG conveners

Starting out as a language professional can be a daunting experience. Connecting with people who are in the same boat can be a great way to navigate the (sometimes choppy!) waters of setting up a new business. SENSE members Danielle Carter, Martina Abagnale, and Anne Oosthuizen have joined forces to set up the Starters SIG, to bring people who are just starting out together. We caught up with them to find out more…

Can you tell us a little about yourselves?
Martina and Anne have been SENSE members since the end of 2019, and Danielle joined at the beginning of 2020. Martina (EN / NL > IT) and Anne (NL <> EN) are both translators; Danielle is a copy editor.

What is the Starters SIG and who is it for?
The Starters SIG is intended to be a space for anyone who is just getting started or is changing paths within the language industry. We hope that members will help shape the SIG so that it best meets their needs, so stay tuned for future developments!

How did the Starters SIG get started?
The three of us met via the SENSE conference in June. We met up to discuss our fledgling careers within the industry and quickly realised how nice it is to have each other to rely on when it comes to getting started (client communication and acquisition, setting rates, marketing ourselves, etc.), and we wanted to create space to do so within SENSE.

How often does the Starters SIG meet up?
We are aiming for once per month (alternating online and in-person meetings, once that seems safer), but this is up for discussion depending on attendee preference.

How many people generally attend Starters SIG meetings?
So far, our unofficial SIG meetings have consisted of just the three of us, but we’re hoping to expand our group to include other starters. Ten people have already signed up for the first meeting!

When and where will the next Starters SIG meeting be?
Our first Starters SIG meeting will be held online via Zoom on 10 September from 19:00 to 20:30. It will be an informal getting-acquainted borrel where we can introduce ourselves and get to know one another. Depending on how it goes, we may also want to kick-start the conversation on what our members would like to get out of the SIG, and how we can meet their needs.

If you'd like to attend the first Starters SIG meeting, be sure to sign up via the Events page!

Cafe photo 14 December 2018 ENHANCED

In this blog series, we are highlighting the different Special Interest Groups (SIGs) SENSE has to offer. SIG meetings are open to all members, and guests are welcome to attend one or two meetings before deciding whether they would like to join SENSE. For upcoming SIG meetings, check the SENSE Events calendar. Contact the SIG convener for more information or to suggest a meeting topic. If you would like to start a new SIG, contact our SIG and Social Events Coordinator. In this edition, we talk to Eastern SIG co-conveners Sally Hill and Kumar Jamdagni.

Can you tell me a little about yourselves?
SH: I was born in Chile and educated in the UK, but moved to the Netherlands in 1990 to join my Dutch husband. We live in Zwolle and have two kids. I joined SENSE when I was starting out as a freelance medical translator back in 2009, which followed a career in science and education. I’m now a medical writer, editor and trainer in scientific writing. While my writing is mainly for the biotech industry, most of my editing and training clients are in academia.

KJ: I was born and bred in London and studied French at City of London Polytechnic (now London Metropolitan University) including a year’s internship in Montauban. With the UK under siege in the summer of ’81 (race riots, sky-high unemployment, Margaret Thatcher) I left for the US with a ‘go with the flow’ attitude. Little did I know that a year later I would be a homeowner in Zwolle, married to a Dutch woman, and teaching English at a language institute! I am currently a translator (Dutch to English) and editor (predominantly academic papers for publication).

What is the Eastern SIG and who is it for?
SH: It’s a regional SIG, so intended for SENSE members living in and around Zwolle. While it’s mainly a great opportunity to have a natter in English with colleagues – particularly appreciated by the lonely freelancers among us – we also share experiences and good practice. We sometimes have an invited speaker and otherwise come up with a theme or activity that is of interest to current members. Recent meetings have discussed levels of editing, time management, and a Brexit newsletter from the IND. Previous topics include the needs of beginners, networking, software, bookkeeping, marketing and workshops/courses that we have attended.

How did the Eastern SIG get started?
KJ: I was one of the founder members of the first SENSE SIG in the late 90s, along with half a dozen other SENSE members, including Dave Thomas and Tony Cunningham; but the driving force was Brenda McClean. Without her enthusiasm, organizing ability and vision, I’m pretty sure there wouldn’t be an Eastern SIG today. The emphasis then (as now) was on promoting professionalism in the field of English-language services, while not forgetting the skills required to run a business – think networking, bookkeeping, even pension schemes. I look forward to being an active member for many years to come.

How often does the Eastern SIG meet up?
SH: We aim to meet up about six times a year, alternating between formal morning meetings and Friday afternoon social get-togethers, although the Covid-19 pandemic has somewhat flummoxed our good intentions. The location varies, but is always within walking distance of . Our previous meeting in April had to be moved online, and SENSE’s first ever ‘editing slam’ generated quite a bit of attention. We had 16 SENSE members attending from all over the world, including the Netherlands, Australia, Switzerland, Germany and Spain! This just goes to show how the pandemic is actually bringing some of us closer together.

How many people generally attend Eastern SIG meetings?
SH: In-person meetings used to attract just six to eight people, but the online meeting in April was our busiest ever. Until it’s safe to meet in person again, we’ll be making use of Zoom to allow more far-flung members to join our meetings.

When and where will the next Eastern SIG meeting be?
SH: Although Kumar and I agree we’d much rather meet in person (it’s been too long!), it’s probably not yet wise. We’ll therefore be meeting online on Thursday 3 September from 14:00 to 15:00. SENSE member and freelance academic editor Dr Claire Bacon – based to the east of the Netherlands (in Germany!) – will be talking about her experience writing a blog and how it helped her expand her client base.

If you'd like to attend the next Eastern SIG meeting, be sure to sign up via the Events page!

person writing in notebook stock photo

In this new blog series, we will highlight the different Special Interest Groups (SIGs) SENSE has to offer. SIG meetings are open to all members, and guests are welcome to attend one or two meetings before deciding whether they would like to join SENSE. For upcoming SIG meetings, check the SENSE Events calendar. Contact the SIG convener for more information or to suggest a meeting topic. If you would like to start a new SIG, contact our SIG and Social Events Coordinator. In this edition, we talk to Copywriting SIG co-conveners Stephen Johnston and Martine Croll.

Can you tell me a little about yourself?
SJ: I grew up in Canada, but moved to the Netherlands in 1997 for love. I joined SENSE in 1999, and it has been one of the best decisions of my life. I wear two hats: I’m a copywriter, mostly working for larger international companies, but I’m also a business trainer. I specialize in consultancies, where I help them write more effectively, present more effectively and create client presentations with impact.

MC: My origins are Dutch, but as a child of expat parents, I had an English education. After school, I decided to go to Leiden University and discover my Dutch roots. Fulfilling my childhood dream to become a writer, I set up business as a copywriter. To be perfectly honest, I started off as a translator – I had cold feet, and no real writing experience. I soon found out that badly written texts are a nightmare to translate, so I often found myself asking the client if I could do a rewrite before getting stuck in the translation. My copywriting business took off from there! Nowadays, besides writing, I help companies find their tone of voice and develop their storyline.

I joined SENSE in the late nineties. After being one of those ‘in the woodwork’ members for several years, I volunteered for the EC. A great and worthwhile experience, where I got to think up and organize loads of fun events. Later on, I joined a wonderful team of fellow members to organize the first-ever SENSE jubilee conference.

What is the Copywriting SIG and who is it for?
SJ: The Copywriting SIG is for anybody and everybody with any interest in copywriting. We get a lot of translators and editors who would like to be copywriters. We also get people who are nervous about copywriting, and want to find out more. And, of course, we get seasoned copywriters who bring a wealth of expertise to our group.

MC: Nothing much to add here! Except that our purpose, above all, is to inspire and get inspired by fellow SENSE members. After all, working as English copywriters for Dutch companies, the issues we deal with are very similar to those our fellow editors and translators face. Our open-discussion meet-ups are perfect for learning from each other. 

How did the Copywriting SIG get started?
SJ: Many years ago, I noticed there were special interest groups for translators, editors and regions. But there were none for copywriters like myself, so I thought I would organize a one-off meeting to bring all of us copywriters together. In between my post and the meeting, somebody at SENSE suggested that I make it a SIG (which I did). The first meeting was above the American Book Center in Amsterdam. Since then, we’ve moved around a lot­­ –  most recently, of course, we meet on Zoom.

I stepped back for a bit a while ago and Martine took over. She was the driving force for many years, and now we are co-conveners.

MC: I’m extremely grateful to Steve for having the brilliant idea to organise something for copywriters. We were (and still are) a minority group within SENSE, so it’s nice to meet up and talk shop every now and then. But, having said that (and at risk of repeating myself), it’s really worthwhile and inspiring to also have non-copywriters or aspiring ones attend and pitch in. 

How often does the Copywriting SIG meet up?
SJ: We try to meet up twice a year. 

MC: We do indeed aim to do so! But both of us are pretty busy with our own freelance business activities. So sometimes we have to give each other a gentle nudge: we should be planning the next meet-up!

How many people generally attend Copywriting SIG meetings?
SJ: When we were holding our in-person meetings, we had anywhere from six or seven people. We also organize much larger gatherings, like the event Martine organized for infographics. Zoom allows many, many more people to attend, which is awesome.

MC: The massive number of attendees for the meet-up on infographics to me is proof that the dividing line between editors, translators and copywriters (and, for that matter, between web designers and graphic designers) is not as clear-cut as we may believe it is. We all need to be able to look outside of our own specialized bubble, especially in this time of online tools and social media. There is more to text than language alone!

When and where will the next Copywriting SIG meeting be?
SJ: The next copywriting SIG meeting will be on Tuesday, 28 July. Everybody is welcome!

MC: We’ll be talking about ghostwriting. It’s something that’s being done a lot. Especially for blogs. But, as always, we hope that attendees will bring their own issue, question, challenge or insight to the floor!

If you'd like to attend the next Copywriting SIG meeting, be sure to sign up via the Events page!

 

This video blog - or vlog - transports us from the start of SENSE when members communicated by letter, telephone and even fax to 30 years later with ten times as many members where members communicate via the Website, online forum and Zoom meetings.

Click here to watch.

South Holland by Sentinel 2

In this new blog series, we will highlight the different Special Interest Groups (SIGs) SENSE has to offer. SIG meetings are open to all members, and guests are welcome to attend one or two meetings before deciding whether they would like to join SENSE. For upcoming SIG meetings, check the SENSE Events calendar. Contact the SIG convener for more information or to suggest a meeting topic. If you would like to start a new SIG, contact our SIG and Social Events Coordinator. In this edition, we talk to Zuid-Holland SIG convener Hans van Bemmelen.

Can you tell me a little about yourself?
I'm Hans van Bemmelen, a technical translator and writer, and a founding member of SENSE. Initially I specialised in chemical engineering, but I now cover a range of specialist subjects such as heavy lifting, remotely piloted aircraft, construction and architecture. I started translating around 33 years ago and writing about a decade ago: B2B marketing copy, and training and operating manuals. I've always been a full-time freelancer.

What is the Zuid-Holland SIG and who is it for?
It does what it says on the tin. Though I suspect some of our members may be aliens from across the provincial borders – which is good. At our most recent Zoom meeting, we even had a participant from Groningen.

How did the Zuid-Holland SIG get started?
The group seems to come and go. I set up its current incarnation – the third, I think – in 2015. We have most of the meetings at my home in The Hague as it is relatively easy to reach by public transport and by car.

How often does the Zuid-Holland SIG meet up?
Not as often as we should, just a few times a year.

How many people generally attend Zuid-Holland SIG meetings?
Around eight. Our members cover nearly the entire language professional spectrum: editing, writing and translating. They also deal with a wide range of subjects. At several of our meetings we've discussed more technical issues, like how to get the best from your computer and software. That inspired our member Jenny Zonneveld to set up the SENSE Tech SIG.

When and where will the next Zuid-Holland SIG meeting be?
We haven't decided that yet, perhaps early July. We'll also have to decide whether to have that on Zoom or physically (with appropriate distancing), perhaps outdoors.

If you'd like to attend the next Zuid-Holland SIG meeting, be sure to keep a close eye on the Events page for details!

FINLEGSIG

In this new blog series, we will highlight the different Special Interest Groups (SIGs) SENSE has to offer. SIG meetings are open to all members, and guests are welcome to attend one or two meetings before deciding whether they would like to join SENSE. For upcoming SIG meetings, check the SENSE Events calendar. Contact the SIG convener for more information or to suggest a meeting topic. If you would like to start a new SIG, contact our SIG and Social Events Coordinator. In this edition, we talk to FINLEGSIG co-conveners John Alexander and John Hynd.

Can you tell me a little about yourselves?
JH: I’ll start. Imagine you’re Heather’s mother. You’ve just flown over from Durham because Heather is in trouble. In the clink actually. She went over for a hen party that got out of hand. The police say that she mistook a police officer for a male stripper and tried to shove a five pound note down his trousers. Heather’s mother (and Heather too) badly need a good translator to help straighten things out. What could be more reassuring for them to know that one of my topics in theology in Rome was the relationship between Augustine’s abandonment of his mother to take ship to Italy and the Church’s subsequent treatment of Mariology?

JA: Actually, yes, that is reassuring. The law regulates all human conduct – well, except for religion and philosophy, but that’s not conduct. Which means the ability to translate (yes, translate!) universal, abstract rules to rules that apply to policemen, male strippers and drinking too much. So an abstract education – mine starts with a History degree – helps. And that applies to finance as well: mezzanine financing, Double Dutch sandwich, all examples of abstract ideas applied to real-life situations.

What is FINLEGSIG and who is it for?
JH: Editors and translators working on financial and legal texts. So go the topics.

How did FINLEGSIG get started?
JA: About ten years ago, Stephen Machon decided it was time for a grouping like that. It was very popular and we’d meet in the splendid offices of a leading law firm on Amsterdam’s Zuidas.

How often does FINLEGSIG meet up?
JH: Three times a year or so.

How many people generally attend FINLEGSIG meetings?
JA: We meet in my place which is easy to get to, so there’s a limit on the numbers: 12, including the speaker. We did, however, increase the numbers to 18 for our latest meeting when Tony Parr was using slides. But then you don’t sit around a table, which is more gezellig. And we’ve found that nibbles and a glass of wine do a lot to make a success of the meeting.

When and where will the next FINLEGSIG meeting be?
JH: We’d normally be planning to meet again in June, but depending on how the social distancing rules evolve, that’s looking very ambitious. Early autumn, maybe. At the usual address on Minervalaan. We don’t like the idea of a video meeting.

Interested in joining the next FINLEGSIG meeting? Keep an eye on the SENSE Events page!

SENSE Ed meeting

In this new blog series, we will highlight the different Special Interest Groups (SIGs) SENSE has to offer. SIG meetings are open to all members, and guests are welcome to attend one or two meetings before deciding whether they would like to join SENSE. For upcoming SIG meetings, check the SENSE Events calendar. Contact the SIG convener for more information or to suggest a meeting topic. If you would like to start a new SIG, contact our SIG and Social Events Coordinator. In this edition, we talk to SENSE Ed convener David Barick.

Can you tell me a little about yourself?
I’ve been a member of SENSE since 2012, which was when I set up my language business. Although I also work as a translator, most of my time is devoted to English teaching. I specialize in academic English, although I’ve taught conversational and business English as well.

What is SENSE Ed and who is it for?
SENSE Ed is a sounding board and information source for people with any sort of involvement in English-language education. As I mentioned above, I’m active in several different areas of education. Some people who attend our meetings have a similar activity pattern, while others devote themselves to only one of those areas. It doesn’t matter as there’s room enough for everybody, and I try to alternate the themes of our meetings so that each field gets attention in turn.

How did SENSE Ed get started?
I don’t know the exact year, but it was shortly after I joined SENSE that Iris Maher took the initiative to set up this group. I had already had some mentoring talks with her, so when she told me about her intention of starting this group and invited me to come and give it a try, I was happy to join. After a few years, Iris asked me to replace her as convener.

How often does SENSE Ed meet up?
We meet twice a year, on Saturday afternoons.

How many people generally attend SENSE Ed meetings?
Anywhere from seven to ten.

When and where will the next SENSE Ed meeting be?
We meet in Utrecht – as you know, exact venues are in a bit of doubt at the moment there. I expect the next meeting will be held in late May or early June barring unforeseen circumstances, if you know what I mean.

Interested in joining the next SENSE Ed meeting? Keep an eye on the Events page!

UniSIG meeting Ludo Waltman

In this new blog series, we will highlight the different Special Interest Groups (SIGs) SENSE has to offer. SIG meetings are open to all members, and guests are welcome to attend one or two meetings before deciding whether they would like to join SENSE. For upcoming SIG meetings, check the SENSE Events calendar. Contact the SIG convener for more information or to suggest a meeting topic. If you would like to start a new SIG, contact our SIG and Social Events Coordinator. In this edition, we talk to UniSIG convener Joy Burrough-Boenisch.

Can you tell me a little about yourself?
I am one of the founding members of SENSE: the tea party at which a group of about ten discussed the idea of starting an organization for English-native-speaking editors was held at my house in Wageningen. I’ve been editing the English of Dutch scientists ever since the late 1970s.

What is UniSIG and who is it for?
UniSIG is for SENSE members with clients in academia.

How did UniSIG get started?
It has grown from the group that drew up SENSE’s guidelines for proofreading student texts, which was set up after former SENSE member Camilla Brokking-Maltas expressed surprise that whereas all Australian universities had such guidelines in place, there weren’t any guidelines in the Netherlands. Initially, Camilla and I were co-conveners but after Camilla resigned from SENSE to pursue another career, I stayed on as convener.

How often does UniSIG meet up?
UniSIG meetings are held three to four times a year.

How many people generally attend UniSIG meetings?
From the outset, they have attracted double-digit audiences. No less than 25 members attended the first meeting in June 2016 and registrations for the meeting held this year on 31 January at one stage exceeded 45! Big turnouts happen not only because so many SENSE members edit, translate or teach for universities and their staff or students but also because we have had excellent speakers (often recruited from the SENSE membership). Another factor could be the growing general awareness of the ethics and challenges of editing for Dutch university clients, as the rise of essay mills has hit the headlines in the UK and the Netherlands and the editing of non-native-English researchers and students is now a hot topic in the applied linguistics world (one of the leading researchers in the field, Nigel Harwood, has twice spoken at SENSE events). And as meetings are held on a Friday, maybe the post-meeting drinks-cum-networking in the bar and the opportunity to meet to eat before or after are irresistible.

When and where will the next UniSIG meeting be?
Unfortunately, planning  a suitable venue for an audience of between 15 and 25 when registrations fluctuate right up to the day of the meeting has become a headache, especially as the cost of hiring venues for more than 10 people are high and have to be paid by SENSE regardless of whether everyone who’s registered turns up. So, for the upcoming meeting on 17 April in Utrecht, we’re reluctantly requiring a registration fee of €10, which will cover at least part of the fee the venue charges per person. SENSE will continue to pick up the tab for the (not inconsiderable) room hire charge. What you’ll get for your money is an excellent is enough to tempt anyone – at a professional, easily accessible venue, plenty of convivial and knowledgeable fellow attendees, plus tea and coffee. A great way to finish the week and start the weekend! 

Interested in joining the UniSIG meeting on 17 April in Utrecht? Click here to register! 

Utrecht SIG drinks
 
In this new blog series, we will highlight the different Special Interest Groups (SIGs) SENSE has to offer. SIG meetings are open to all members, and guests are welcome to attend one or two meetings before deciding whether they would like to join SENSE. Check the events calendar for upcoming SIG meetings. Contact the SIG convener for more information or to suggest a meeting topic. If you would like to start a new SIG, contact our SIG and Social Events Coordinator. In this edition, we talk to Utrecht SIG convener Maartje Gorte.
 
Can you tell me a little about yourself?

I started out as a language professional in 2010 after I quit my PhD in Genetics halfway through. I quickly found SENSE and the Utrecht SIG. It was – and remains – a delight to be among people whose brains work the same way as mine. Professionally, I enjoy working with technology companies and universities: complex, but broad enough to stay interesting.

What is the Utrecht SIG and who is it for?

The SIG started as the aptly-named Utrecht Translation Group over 20 years ago and stayed true to its origins. It’s for people who enjoy traveling to Utrecht to discuss translations; anything from analysis reports to opera. When we have an interesting text, we spend the first half of the meeting discussing the text and the second half on shop talk. When we don't have a text, there’s more time for shop talk. The SIG is interesting to a wide audience: even if you’re not a translator, it can be good practice to wrap your head around a translation puzzle and think about language and culture in a different way. 

How often does the Utrecht SIG meet up?

Every second Wednesday of odd-numbered months. The last year has been hit and miss due to trouble finding a suitable venue, but we’re trying out a new place for the upcoming meeting. 

How many people generally attend Utrecht SIG meetings?

Anywhere from 4 to 20, usually around 8. Luckily, we always get a good conversation going, no matter the group size. 

When and where will the next Utrecht SIG meeting be?

Wednesday 11 March in community centre Oase, from 19:30 to 21:30. We're still looking for a text to discuss, so if you've recently done a troublesome, funny, cross-culturally complex or otherwise interesting translation, please let me know!

Would you like to attend the next Utrecht SIG? Register at the Events page today!

conference preview

Photo by Michael Hartwigsen, taken at the SENSE 2018 Conference in Den Bosch. All rights reserved.

With the SENSE 2020 conference only a few months away and registration now open, it’s time to take a closer look at some of the presenters. They come from all around the world: Luxembourg, Spain, Finland, Canada, the United Kingdom, Belgium… Several presenters come from outside the Society, but the SENSE delegation is nothing to scoff at! Below are the names of all those representing SENSE during the pre-conference workshops and conference programme:

Ann Bless
Anouschka Schutte
Ashley Cowles (panel coordinator)
Claire Bacon
Daphne Visser-Lees
David Barick
Ellen Singer
Jackie Senior
Jenny Zonneveld
John Hynd
John Linnegar
Joy Burrough Boenisch
Justine Sherwood
Kate McIntyre
Laura Damiano
Maria Sherwood Smith
Marieke Krijnen
Paulien Copper (panel coordinator)
Sally Hill
Tony Parr

For an overview of all workshops and presentations, check out the full conference programme!

What are you hoping attendees will take away from your session?
Claire Bacon: “Language professionals with plenty of good clients and who are regularly turning work away probably don't need to start blogging. My talk is aimed at those of us looking to build our client base. I am hoping that my talk will inspire others to attract the clients they want by sharing useful, good-quality content. I understand how intimidating it can be to put yourself out there in this way, so I will also give tips on responding to criticism – and accepting compliments – publicly.”

Marieke Krijnen on her talk about the mental and physical health challenges faced by digital nomads: “I’m hoping attendees will walk away with some concrete tips and tools, and feel that they are not alone.”

Ashley Cowles: “Unexpected tips, useful tricks and silly ideas that will help or at least resonate with other parents trying to juggle work and kids. The main thing is to remember that even the most experienced juggler inevitably drops some balls from time to time – just try to make sure you don’t drop the most fragile ones.”

Ann Bless: “An example of a four-day course and advice on how to teach a successful course on scientific writing as well as my support, from a distance, if they start teaching.”

Justine Sherwood: “That they will look into alternative ways to travel instead of just hopping on a plane, something we’ve become too accustomed to.”

What are you most looking forward to in regards to the conference?
Jenny Zonneveld: “I'm particularly looking forward to spending time with colleagues and friends I otherwise only chat with digitally. And of course learning from them too. The programme looks fascinating, so it's going to be hard to decide which breakout sessions to attend!”

John Linnegar: “Learning from colleagues, especially from the younger, more tech-savvy ones about using social media to enhance one's business. Networking. Catching up with friends in the business. And savouring whatever Maastricht has to offer.”

Sally Hill: “I’m really looking forward to meeting up with both longstanding colleagues and new people, especially attendees from other countries. For me the conference is just as much about networking as it is about sharing and learning from each other.”

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